Check out ‘Let’s Get Earthy’ How to Prune Your Lavender video here:




The ancient Egyptians used lavender to make their

‘mummies’ smell sweet.


There are currently over 45 species and 450 varieties of lavender and more are being classified all the time.



The nectar from lavender plants is used to make high quality honey - go bees - however it is seriously disliked by mosquitoes and other creepy crawlies.


In the ‘language’ of flowers, it is said that lavender can mean devotion, luck, success and happiness. Also purity, devotion, serenity, grace and calmness.


You can’t grow lavender from seeds - you have to cut a woody bit off and stick it into the ground.


It is part of the wider mint family.



The flowers and leaves can be used fresh, and both buds and stems can be used dried.


Lavender tea is becoming more popular

again - it’s not just our grannies who love to drink it! (check out our recipe below)


In electroencephalography (EEG) studies, inhalation of 10% lavender oil increased alpha and theta wave activity in the brain, patterns which are also


consistent with relaxation and better mood.*


Before modern extraction methods, there was a technique known as ‘enfleurage’. Animal fats were spread out and sprinkled with the plants from which they wanted to extract the oil, until they had reached the desired concentration. The infused fat could then be applied to the skin as a treatment for a variety of ailments. (Luckily Aunty Amy’s has done all the hard work for you - see our products containing lavender below.)

‘Lavandula angustifolia’ sounds like something from a Harry Potter movie, but is actually the scientific name for one of the extremely versatile and well-known varieties in the lavender family. Although lavender is not officially classified as a herb, because of its woody stem, it is generally considered an essential for any herb garden. Its beneficial health and well-being p


roperties have been much sought after for thousands of years.

Coming from the Latin verb, ‘lavare’ which means ‘to wash’, lavender offers far more than just its perfume. You can eat it, drink teas made with it, make oil from it, use its smell to soothe ragged nerves, use it to make a pretty flower arrangement, keep insects away with it, make a hedge of it, infuse it in balms - the list goes on.


Throughout history, lavender has been used in aromatherapy. The fragrance from the oils of the lavender plant is believed to help promote calmness and wellness. It's also said to help reduce stress, anxiety, and possibly even mild pain.



Plant Lavender in your garden or patio planters

Lavender is easy to grow, even in a pot for those with limited growing areas. Ask your local nursery what type of lavender is best for your area and your needs. English lavender (‘Lavandula angustifolia’) is most suitable for culinary consumption. In addition, lavender in your garden attracts bees, looks pretty, is easy to maintain, is not a water guzzler and requires minimal maintenance.


Make some Luscious Lavender Tea


English lavender is the best for tea making - arousing senses of taste and smell. Be sure to use either fresh or dried, organic or pesticide free lavender (lavender oil is not safe for consumption).

Lavender tea couldn’t be easier to make. Boil the kettle, put some lavender in your favourite tea pot or strainer (approx ½ teaspoon per cup), pour on the boiling water and steep for 3-5 minutes. Add some honey to taste, put your feet up and relax!

Some studies suggest that consuming lavender as a tea can help digestive issues such as vomiting, nausea, intestinal gas, upset stomach, and abdominal swelling. In addition to helping with digestive problems, lavender is used to help relieve pain from headaches, sprains, toothaches, and sores.

Dab a little Lavender oil on your 'hanky’

favourite ‘something’ so you can sniff it and reap the health benefits of the beautiful aroma. Our grandmas knew the relaxing, de-stressing properties of lavender and I remember many a winter night sleeping with a lavender hanky on my pillow.

Make yourself a Lavender Shower Steamer


I found this great idea to add an extra relaxing boost to your bedtime shower to help you get a great night’s sleep.

To find out how to make your own Lavender Shower Steamer Click Here

Purchase some Aunty Amy’s Balms


We’ve done the work for you, helping you get more lavender in your life!

These Aunty Amy’s Herbal Balms contain this ancient, versatile and helpful 'herb', as well as other super herbs to assist you and your well being. Each of the ingredients found in our products are carefully selected for their quality, medicinal properties and effectiveness. Only essential healing ingredients are used, no fillers, no extras, no chemicals. The goodness of 100% natural ingredients, and nothing else!






"Grandma knew what she was on about! There are so many reasons to include or increase the use of lavender in your daily life - go, do, enjoy!"


*Source: Medical News Today

Note: Speak with your healthcare provider before using lavender if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, or have an underlying health condition.

Further Reading

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265922

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/lavender-tea-benefits

Check out the Aunty Amy's range today

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